paying for college

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kay333lol
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Joined: Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:00 pm

paying for college

Post by kay333lol » Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:01 pm

This article from https://writemyessay.pro/do-my-project/ touches on the important, and in many instances, unforgotten truth that most US medical school graduates borrow large sums of money to finance their education. In addition, the training period (residency) that follows provides a relatively small income. By the time that young physicians enter practice they are heavily in debt, which will take them many years (perhaps a lifetime) to repay. It is this incurrence of debt which plays a pivotal role in specialty selection. Those who choose primary care will struggle to repay the high-debt which they owe.

As a former primary care physician I do have some suggestions:

First, allow a grace period during residency training during which interest on educational loans is not incurred.

Second, the US government should create an employment track to the US Veterans Hospital System that is financially attractable to new graduates (salary, loan repayment). This should be a win-win situation. It may attract well-trained US medical school graduates to assist in the care of our neediest and most complex patients while at the same time provide some form of financial relief for the young physician. More programs (some of which do exist) for underserved communities could be created in this same manner, but there has to be financial incentive to the physician.

Third, the reimbursement rates for primary care providers need to be increased. The ability to maintain an office from the payments received by commercial insurance make it quite difficult if not impossible to cover office expenses. A well-trained primary care physician is worth her weight in gold. Primary care providers must be recognized financially for the care that they deflect from the emergency department (which can cost $1,000 for triage alone!)

Our medical system is broken on many fronts. Allowing young physicians to graduate with astronomical debt is certainly not the right first-step to fixing a system that is already broken.

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